Hacking ILEARN: The Continuous Improvement Plan

Hacking ILEARN: The Continuous Improvement Plan

  14 Nov 2019   , ,


Hacking ILEARN: The Continuous Improvement
Plan The Continuous Improvement Plan is a process
with two prerequisites: a mission statement and data related to something you want to
improve. The process has four steps: Goal Objective Action Plan and Measurement
This is all easier to understand with an example, so let’s imagine that my personal life is
a department at Red Rocks called the GUY department. First, the prerequisites. The mission for the GUY department is: to
live a healthy, peaceful and productive life. Second, the data. I got a physical exam and the results show
that I am ten pounds overweight, my blood pressure is high, and I have a vitamin D deficiency. I have the prerequisites so now I can start the
process. Step 1. Develop a goal. Goals align with the mission statement and
are based on the data. They are also unmeasurable. For the GUY department, my goal is to improve
my physical health. This goal aligns with my mission and is based
on the data. It is also unmeasurable. There is no way to measure physical health
without being more specific. What would I be measuring? This takes us to step 2. Step 2. Develop an objective. An objective is a measurable manifestation
of your goal. For the GUY department, the objective is to
lose 10 pounds. This is a specific way to improve physical
health and can be measured. Now I need a way to get there. Step 3. Create an action plan. This is the course of action you will take
to reach your objective. For the GUY department, the action plan is
to walk for 45 minutes every day for three months. Step 4. Figure out how to measure your action and
define what constitutes success. For the GUY department, I am going to weigh
myself once a week and chart my progress. Success means losing at least 10 pounds in
three months. I find it helpful to have the success indicator
built into the objective. Here, the objective is to lose 10 pounds,
and success is achieving that objective. Now we are done with the process, and we have
a new data set. So, we repeat the process. Repeating this process is what we call continuous
quality improvement. Here’s another hypothetical example from the
SPA department. First, the prerequisites. Here’s our mission: to provide opportunities
for anyone interested to learn and practice Spanish in order to communicate with a broader
community. Here’s data on something we want to improve. In SPA 111, the average score on the irregular
verb test is 55%. Now we start the four-step process. Step 1. Our goal is to increase student success in
SPA 111. This aligns with our mission and it is based
on data. It is also unmeasurable. We need to be more specific in order to do
a measurement. Step 2. Our objective is to increase the average score
on the irregular verb test by 15%, which would bring the average up to 70%. Step 3. Our action plan is to redesign the course
schedule to create a review day dedicated specifically to irregular verbs. Step 4. To measure our action, we will calculate the
average student score on the irregular verb test. This will be a success if the average performance
on these evaluations increases by 15%. Once again, the success indicator is built
into the objective. The objective is to raise scores by 15%, so
if we accomplish that, it’s a success. Now we are done with the process, and we have
a new data set. So, we start again taking into account the
new data.

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