Cursive Penmanship – Starting with $5 Stationery

Cursive Penmanship – Starting with $5 Stationery


Hello everyone. Welcome to The Penman
Project. The purpose of this channel is to help you learn cursive handwriting. If
you don’t have much background in calligraphy or penmanship, this is a good
place for you to start. By the way, I’m not a native speaker, so please excuse my
English. If you find it difficult to follow, please turn on the subtitle.
Here’s a list of everything I’m going to discuss. You need a pencil, pencil refills,
some paper, an optional eraser, maybe a ruler and a paper clip. I’ll go over them
one by one. If you follow my advice, the whole set of stationery should cost you
around $5. Now let’s get started with the pencil. For our beginners, I suggest that
you start with a point five millimeter HB lead mechanical pencil. I wouldn’t
suggest that you use a wood pencil to practice handwriting, because the tip of
the wood pencil gets blunt overtime and when you sharpen the tip, it can suddenly
change from very blunt to very sharp which can break the consistency of your
writing. Also I don’t recommend that you invest
too early in buying a fountain pen or deep pen. Those ready instruments can be expensive and are more suitable for advanced users. It is true that a tip pen
can be more expressive, but here we are just getting started with the basics.
Such as how to keep your slant angle consistent. After you have mastered the
fundamentals, you may upgrade your writing instrument. Right now what’s most
important is that you are comfortable with a grip section of the pencil and
that you are choosing the right lead. So next let’s talk about led refills.
There are two things you need to considers when buying the lead: the
diameters and softness. The most common diameters are 0.3 0.5 and point 7
millimeters. As you can see from the picture the difference is very
pronounced. In my opinion the 0.3 millimeter lead is just too scratchy and
uncomfortable to write with and it’s not a good option for beginners. On the other
hand the 0.7 millimeter lead is too broad and the broad stroke will hide a
lot of the details of your letters. It is good for note-taking, because you can
write very quickly and you don’t have to get every letter perfect while you can
still easily achieve the uniform look of an elegant handwriting. But if you are
trying to improve your penmanship, this is equivalent to cheating. So it’s not
recommended. For beginners the 0.5 millimeter that is probably the best
place to start. The guide Sheila created works best for this led and I’m also
using it for my daily writing. Here is a writing sample to compare the
three different lead diameters. The next thing you need to consider when choosing
the lead is the softness of the lead. Here’s another example to demonstrate
the graphite grading scale. The letter H stands for hardness, B stands for
blackness, and the number is the measure of intensity. For example here, 3B is
blacker than 2B which is blacker than 1 B. HB is the most common options and is
typically what you will get by default when you buy a mechanical pencil.
Anything harder than HB is not recommended, because the harder the lead,
the more pressure it requires for you to write, and you can get tired very
quickly. On the other hand you don’t want to lead to be too soft neither, because
you will lose all the friction and the tactile feedback on the paper which will
make it very hard for you to control the line. So for beginner the best place to
start with is probably the HB lead. In case you are feeling uncomfortable or
just getting curious, then you may gently nudge in either direction of the
gradient scale until you find what works best for you. The next item on the list is paper, and
that brings up another advantage of using pencil. That is, you don’t need to
worry too much about paper. If you are using a fountain pen, then you might need
heavier paper such as a Rhodia pad, so that the ink doesn’t bleed through. But
if you use in pencil, any kind of paper would work, and there is only one
requirement. That is that paper should be blank. The reason you need a blank paper
is that you need to overlay the blank paper on a guide sheet as you practice,
and you need a ruler to create the guide sheet The guide sheet looks like this: it has
five spaces. The middle three spaces are four millimeters each. The top and bottom spaces are two millimeters each. There is also a 58 degrees slant angle which
determines how much your handwriting leans toward the right. If you are already
writing with a consistent scale and slant, then you should use the ruler to
make your own guide sheet. Otherwise feel free to use my guide sheet which you can
find in the description below. I don’t suggest that you write directly on a
guide sheet because the lines of the guide sheet will hide some of the
details of your letters which make them look better than they
actually are. By the way when you are printing the guide sheet, make sure it’s
printed at the original scale. The next item, I’d like to discuss is
the eraser. This may sound strange to you but I suggest that you shouldn’t use the
eraser at all. If you write something bad you don’t have to erase it, just write it
again and see if you can improve. Another reason you should not use the eraser on
top of your pencil is that when you flip your pencil 180 degree to erase
something and then flip it back the pencil is no longer at the same
orientation as before. And the tip may actually land on a sharper edge which
can suddenly break the consistency of your writing. The last item on the list
is a binder or paper clip, the purpose of which is just to bind the practice sheet
and the guide sheet together. That’s basically everything you need to get
started. The pencil cost me $1. The lead costs $0.99. You’ll probably get some paper and binder for your school library or work place for free. You shouldn’t need a
eraser and the ruler is also optional. So the whole set of stationery should cost
you around $5. I hope you find this video useful. If you liked it please subscribe
for more tutorials and in the next video we will actually start writing letters.
Thank you for watching and I’ll see you next time.

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