Calligraphy Alphabet N-Z : Calligraphy Tips: Writing Letters U,V,& W

Calligraphy Alphabet N-Z : Calligraphy Tips: Writing Letters U,V,& W


Coming to a point, thinner line, second stroke
is a thinner line; bilateral symmetry.
Okay, now there was no “U” in the original Roman alphabet; the “U” actually, later on
in history, became a real letter as the “V”, started to relax a little bit, and get a little
bit relaxed, and pretty soon you had two letters for two slightly different sounds, so the
“U” is a more modern letter. It is a single story letter, so you want to keep it wide
enough. The “V” is also a single story letter so you want to keep that wide enough. What
makes a “V” a “V”? The fact that it doesn’t have a crossbar? The fact that it doesn’t
have the two legs of a “M”? Here it is, being all itself. Now the “W”, remember how the
“U” started out as a “V”, so that’s somehow how you wind up I guess calling this a “W”.
But the “W” is also a letter that got added later, and if we were to think of it in terms
of being two “V”, okay, it would be way too wide. We want to keep it bilateral symmetrical
because that’s the way we are, bilateral symmetrical, so we’re comfortable with that idea, and all
the rest of the other letters. So what we’re going to do is we’re going to just make the
two parts of the “W”, these two “V” a little bit less wide, a little narrower.

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